Atlanta Mayor is not as bright as she thinks she is...

AuHoosier420

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That’s just a sad way to look at it. No one should be above the law, including the police. No one should be unjustly accused either, including the police, but I think people are exaggerating the police treatment. Even though I think the Atlanta officer was overcharged, this isn’t the first time an officer was charged with murder for shooting a man in the back as they ran away. See the Walter Scott case.
there is a movement to defund police departments now all across the country and you think the treatment is exaggerated? That’s just being extremely naive...
 

Southtiger

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The ATL DA (district attorney and dumbass) is quoted as saying in an unrelated statement that a taser is a deadly weapon. This will be very difficult to explain in a courtroom when a defense attorney plays this clip multiple times.
 

KILLAKONG

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Lol ignorance is bliss

Ive seen people plead just like this, but it was the other way around. Pleading to go home, to be left alone, using the words I didn't do nothing, and are still harassed because of the color of their skin, or because of the depth of their pockets, or because their own the wrong side of town. Im sorry but I have no sympathy for any of these officers. Chickens coming home to roost, and in the words of a great leader Malcolm X " Me being a country boy myself, I have never been upset about chickens coming home to roost".
 

AU_Panther

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It’s being implied and there Work is being politicized. Also a movement to defund them. Open your eyes
Some police officers like the idea of defunding. I thought it was ridiculous until I was educated on the matter. The feedback I received from a friend of mine that is an officer, Sargent, is that they are asked to do too many things. Defunding the police will mean they’ll only be dispatched when they’re absolutely needed.

I’m still kind of hesitant to buy in on defunding though.

We’re crazy in America. We go to one extreme to the next. No one needs weapons taken away from cartoons, no need to get rid of cop shows and I originally wanted more money for the police.

The solution is get rid of bad officers, permanently, prosecute them when they commit crimes and update the training. Fund programs that help with officer and community relationships.
 

Bassman

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They’ve done tons of studies on this. Imo it’s the greatest racial issue in this country. This article not only highlights some of those issues, it talks about the vast amount of studies, it’s an opinion piece, but I chose it because it has sources and discusses the volume of studies: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opin...g-racial-disparities-criminal-justice-system/
There's no real denying the massive disparities that exist, and when people talk about "systemic" racism, this is the kind of thing they mean. But the disparities also mirror those that are present for all races between those that are poor and those that are wealthy and the types of crimes they are charged with, of course. They're the kinds of disparities that have plagued all societies throughout history, and they plague ours as well.

Does that mean they cannot be addressed? Of course not, but a rethinking of so many things is necessary to even begin to make a dent in this particular monolith that it is daunting in the extreme. The ineptly-named "defund the police" suggestion is at its best this sort of re-imagining and I suspect the coming years will be grand experiments in policing to see if alternative methods are effective.

Given American society, I think they are primed to fail, but try they must.
 

AU_Panther

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there is a movement to defund police departments now all across the country and you think the treatment is exaggerated? That’s just being extremely naive...
Defunding the police, doesn’t mean getting rid of them. It’s just using some of the money in different ways. Using it to better handle mental illness, education, etc. Only extreme people want to actually get rid of the police. https://www.thecut.com/2020/06/what-does-defund-the-police-mean-the-phrase-explained.html
 

AUfamily82

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They’ve done tons of studies on this. Imo it’s the greatest racial issue in this country. This article not only highlights some of those issues, it talks about the vast amount of studies, it’s an opinion piece, but I chose it because it has sources and discusses the volume of studies: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opin...g-racial-disparities-criminal-justice-system/
I think you should dive deeper than that. There is, also, a reason for any bias. Is that reason due to racism or profiling? After 9/11 when you walked through an airport who was being searched and profiled? It was people of middle eastern decent, all middle eastern people.

African Americans make up 13.4% (2019) percent of the population, and the same race accounts for more than 50% of murder/manslaughter charges. The fact is that African Americans account for a low number of the population yet at the same time account for over 30% of committed crimes in the US (excluding misdemeanors like DUI, etc.).

Do you feel this is due to a bias in the justice system? Are these numbers true simply because of skin color? I believe these numbers are the way they are due to far more than the color of skin. There is a problem, but the problem can’t be dumped on one particular group of people.

I believe crimes are driven more socio-economically than racially. Based on FBI tables from 2017, I have to go with the numbers agree with my statement. It’s crazy to see how certain crimes are dominated by one race over another.
 
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BeatBama60

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That’s just a sad way to look at it. No one should be above the law, including the police. No one should be unjustly accused either, including the police, but I think people are exaggerating the police treatment. Even though I think the Atlanta officer was overcharged, this isn’t the first time an officer was charged with murder for shooting a man in the back as they ran away. See the Walter Scott case.
You cannot compare the two cases. You are way too reasonable for that.

This guy operated within procedure. Scott was shot down for no reason. That’s why Scott’s murderer was convicted, and this guy won’t be.
 

AU_Panther

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I think you should dive deeper than that. There is, also, a reason for any bias. Is that reason due to racism or profiling? After 9/11 when you walked through an airport who was being searched and profiled? It was people of middle eastern decent, all middle eastern people.

African Americans make up 13.4% (2019) percent of the population, and the same race accounts for more than 50% of murder/manslaughter charges. The fact is that African Americans account for a low number of the population yet at the same time account for over 30% of committed crimes in the US (excluding misdemeanors like DUI, etc.).

Do you feel this is due to a bias in the justice system? Are these numbers true simply because of skin color? I believe these numbers are the way they are due to far more than the color of skin. There is a problem, but the problem can’t be dumped on one particular group of people.

I believe crimes are driven more socio-economically than racially. Based on FBI tables from 2017, I have to go with the numbers agree with my statement. It’s crazy to see how certain crimes are dominated by one race over another.
Yeah it’s true. Blacks are poorer and that accounts for why there’s more crime in those communities, but that being said all of these studies. Well most, neutralize for that and in the case with marijuana use, there’s no difference, yet blacks get arrested and charged more. You’re more likely to be pulled over, when the charges are the same, you’re going to get heavier sentencing. Some of the disparity will be attributed to racial bias, but even if it weren’t it doesn’t make it right to treat every person of color like they’re a criminal.

In regards to the shootings, it’s not always white officers and not always black victims, but there’s been some real tragedies, either way.
 
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AU_Panther

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You cannot compare the two cases. You are way too reasonable for that.

This guy operated within procedure. Scott was shot down for no reason. That’s why Scott’s murderer was convicted, and this guy won’t be.
They’re comparable, just not completely the same. But I do agree it’s politically motivated. There’s no doubt that the most this officer would’ve been charged with would be manslaughter. I haven’t read whether or not it was part of procedure though.
 
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Justin93

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LOL, at anyone thinking its an american right to have police protection, and then in the same breath protesting to defund the police. Its liek the police are only ok, when you need them.
It’s the American way!! If its good for you or your family’s life or property they’re protecting the rules don’t apply but If it’s someone else They’re burning down then it’s ok.
 

AUTack

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They are not even remotely the same. The Walter Scott case did not involve a violent attack on the officer, stealing the officers weapon and firing the weapon at the officer. This case involves the deceased committing multiple violent felonies.
 
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BeatBama60

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Service weapons are being discharged for nothing though. We have scary police. You shouldn't take the job if your not built for it.[/QUOTE/]

How many weapons are discharged? As a percentage of arrests and/or contacts?
 
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KILLAKONG

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I don't need stats. One dead person is enough. If a officer cant handle a small situation without drawing his service weapon, then he doesn't need the job. If you pull a weapon your life should be in danger. To many people dead, and the officers life weren't in in danger. If a officer cant handle a scuffle, then he needs a new profession IMHO.
 

BeatBama60

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I don't need stats. One dead person is enough. If a officer cant handle a small situation without drawing his service weapon, then he doesn't need the job. If you pull a weapon your life should be in danger. To many people dead, and the officers life weren't in in danger. If a officer cant handle a scuffle, then he needs a new profession IMHO.
Ignore facts if you want to. I’m not an imbecile, so I won’t substitute emotion for facts.
 

kenews

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Yeah I’m pretty sure you can find plenty of people are ok with racism and there’s even more that say it’s not ok, yet are racists. And that goes for all people. Fact of the matter the numbers show that there’s racism in the way we handle justice. Whether you want to say it’s more about class, it doesn’t matter. That isn’t justice.

I also disagree that the police or more vilified than anyone can imagine. Because most people just have a problem with the bad police officers. But if some guys are willing to call out or walk off the job, it says a lot about their lack of character and dedication to the oath they took. Plain and simple.

First of all nothing in the numbers show that race is prevalent in the way justice is handled. The fact you bring up that more black people are being arrested does not mean that race was the reason they were arrested. The people calling for the police are not worrying about race when they do it. The fact you want to believe that there is some type of racism because more get arrested is just false.

The police are facing changes to almost everything they do because they are perceived as people who misuse their authority. There are hundreds of thousands of people protesting, looting, rioting, etc to show their anger at police. Show me that in the general public. Just because you believe their is racism whether they say it is or not is just your belief. These people are stating it out in public and in groups actually hurling insults and rocks at the police. That is an assault.

So if I was the police and we have systemic racism, I would walk off the duty until they figure out rules to get rid of systemic racism. You can't have them wanting to protect you when you say all of them are racist.
 
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Pachuta20

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Police officers are no different than any other job, in the sense if you feel the money is not enough, the support is not there, or the dept/environment is toxic they can leave and pursue another place to work. It's not the military where they sign a contract. Police are tasked with way to much, armchair quarterbacked relentlessly, and shit on constantly.

Name another profession where the whole profession is labeled as "bad" over individual incidents. If a doctor kills someone in a botched surgery, no one protests to defund doctors. It's a losing battle all around for police. The same people screaming to do away with police are the same ones who are too afraid to ask their neighbor to turn down the music. So again, it's lose lose.

News flash.....there are terrible people everywhere. They need to be rooted out and punished accordingly. Also, terrible people should not be put on a pedestal for political gain. Police have a split second to decide in a life and death situation. The world gets hours to tell them everything they feel was wrong.
 
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hooter80

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Defunding the police, doesn’t mean getting rid of them. It’s just using some of the money in different ways. Using it to better handle mental illness, education, etc. Only extreme people want to actually get rid of the police. https://www.thecut.com/2020/06/what-does-defund-the-police-mean-the-phrase-explained.html

The problem is that a large percentage of those protesting for defunding openly admit that their idea of defunding is elimination of the police.
 

acepippen

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It’s actually a very hard circumstance to reconcile with. If a police officer believes in what he is doing, and it’s his time to work, he should continue to work to do the very thing he believes in, no matter the outside circumstance.

However outside circumstance forces the officers to fight for what they believe in for serving and protecting in the first place.
Actually to most police it’s a place of employment. And like every other person they can quit their job if it sucks.
 

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